Loading...

Anorexia Nervosa: A Complex Disorder with No Single Cause

1. Introduction

Anorexia Nervosa is an eating disorder that is characterized by an intense fear of gaining weight, self-starvation and excessive weight loss. It usually begins during adolescence and affects girls more often than boys. ( American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Although the main focus of this paper is on anorexia, it should be noted that there are other types of eating disorders such as Bulimia nervosa and Binge eating disorder.

Eating disorders are complex and there is no single cause. They are thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, psychological, social and cultural factors. (NEDA, 2016). There is growing evidence that certain types of personality are more at risk of developing an eating disorder. People who are perfectionists, have low self-esteem and are highly self-critical are more likely to develop anorexia. (Smink et al., 2012).

The media plays a role in the development of eating disorders. Studies have shown that exposure to thin models and images of unrealistic body standards can lead to body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviours. (Groesz et al., 2002). The pressure to be thin is particularly intense for girls and young women. In our Western culture, thinness is seen as the epitome of beauty and success. For many young women, being thin is seen as a way to attain social success and acceptance.

2. Gender and Post-war periods

The documentary "Thin" explores the lives of four women with anorexia nervosa who are residents of a treatment facility in Florida, USA. The film provides insight into the psychological motivations behind their disorder as well as the physical and emotional consequences of their illness.

One of the women featured in the film, Shelly, grew up in the post-war period when food was rationed. Her experience with hunger may have contributed to her fear of gaining weight. In our Western culture, food is readily available and we tend to take it for granted. For many people with anorexia, the fear of becoming overweight or obese is greater than the fear of starvation.

Another woman featured in the film, Brittany, grew up in a religious family where she was not allowed to wear makeup or revealing clothing. She felt trapped by her family’s strict rules and began self-harming as a way to express her pain. Brittany’s experience highlights the fact that eating disorders can be a way for people to gain control over their lives when they feel like they have no control over anything else.

3. Post-industrial society

In our Western society, we live in a post-industrial society where looks matter more than ever before. We live in a culture that places a lot of importance on appearance and success. In our culture, thinness is seen as the epitome of beauty and success. This pressure to be thin is particularly intense for girls and young women who are constantly bombarded with images of unattainable body standards in the media.

4. Social status and mode of life

The media plays a role in the development of eating disorders by perpetuating the unrealistic belief that thinner is better. Studies have shown that exposure to thin models and images of unrealistic body standards can lead to body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviours. (Groesz et al., 2002).

The pressure to be thin is not just coming from the media, it is also coming from our society’s obsession with youth and success. In our culture, youth and beauty are highly valued and ageing is seen as a negative process. This obsession with youth and beauty has led to the development of the anti-ageing industry which is estimated to be worth billions of dollars.

5. shape, cultural, social and environmental factors

Although there is no single cause of anorexia nervosa, there are thought to be a number of contributing factors. These include genetic, psychological, social and cultural factors. (NEDA, 2016).

There is growing evidence that certain types of personality are more at risk of developing an eating disorder. People who are perfectionists, have low self-esteem and are highly self-critical are more likely to develop anorexia. (Smink et al., 2012).

The media plays a role in the development of eating disorders. Studies have shown that exposure to thin models and images of unrealistic body standards can lead to body dissatisfaction and disordered eating behaviours. (Groesz et al., 2002).

6. Anorexia and the fast food industry

Another factor that may contribute to the development of anorexia is the Western world’s obsession with fast food. In our culture, fast food is seen as cheap, convenient and tasty. However, it is also high in calories and low in nutrients. This combination of factors can lead to weight gain and obesity which can then trigger disordered eating behaviours.

7. Conclusion

Anorexia nervosa is a complex disorder with no single cause. It is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic, psychological, social and cultural factors. The media plays a role in the development of eating disorders by perpetuating the unrealistic belief that thinner is better. In our Western society, we live in a post-industrial society where looks matter more than ever before. We live in a culture that places a lot of importance on appearance and success. In our culture, thinness is seen as the epitome of beauty and success. This pressure to be thin is particularly intense for girls and young women who are constantly bombarded with images of unattainable body standards in the media.

FAQ

The different types of anorexia include restricting type, binge-eating/purging type, and atypical anorexia.

Anorexia develops due to a combination of genetic, biological, psychological, and social factors.

Individuals who are most at risk for developing anorexia include those with a family history of the disorder, those who have experienced trauma or abuse, and those who have perfectionistic tendencies or low self-esteem.

Some of the physical effects of anorexia include weight loss, fatigue, muscle weakness, and slowed heart rate. Some of the psychological effects include preoccupation with food and body image, distorted body image, and excessive exercise.

Treatments for people with anorexia typically involve a combination of individual therapy, group therapy, nutritional counseling, and medical monitoring.

Recovery from anorexia is possible with treatment; however, it is often a long process that requires significant effort and commitment from both the individual and their support system.

Some things that can be done to prevent the development of anorexia in vulnerable individuals include increasing awareness about the disorder and its risk factors as well as promoting healthy body image and self-esteem

Cite this assignment

Free Essay Samples (December 2, 2022) Anorexia Nervosa: A Complex Disorder with No Single Cause. Retrieved from https://essayholic.com/anorexia-nervosa-a-complex-disorder-with-no-single-cause/.
"Anorexia Nervosa: A Complex Disorder with No Single Cause." Free Essay Samples - December 2, 2022, https://essayholic.com/anorexia-nervosa-a-complex-disorder-with-no-single-cause/
Free Essay Samples March 6, 2022 Anorexia Nervosa: A Complex Disorder with No Single Cause., viewed December 2, 2022,<https://essayholic.com/anorexia-nervosa-a-complex-disorder-with-no-single-cause/>
Free Essay Samples - Anorexia Nervosa: A Complex Disorder with No Single Cause. [Internet]. [Accessed December 2, 2022]. Available from: https://essayholic.com/anorexia-nervosa-a-complex-disorder-with-no-single-cause/
"Anorexia Nervosa: A Complex Disorder with No Single Cause." Free Essay Samples - Accessed December 2, 2022. https://essayholic.com/anorexia-nervosa-a-complex-disorder-with-no-single-cause/
"Anorexia Nervosa: A Complex Disorder with No Single Cause." Free Essay Samples [Online]. Available: https://essayholic.com/anorexia-nervosa-a-complex-disorder-with-no-single-cause/. [Accessed: December 2, 2022]

More Related papers

Top